© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003                      The covers of the books you receive may differ very slightly from those pictured here.
YEVGHENIY ZAMYATIN was born in a small Russian town, to a poor aristocratic family, in 1884. Trained in St. Petersburg as an engineer and shipbuilder, in 1920, Zamyatin wrote We as a parody of a utopia written by two Communist ideologues whose main conceit was global reorganization of the world based on “eradication of soul and the feeling of love in man.” He sent the manuscript abroad, where, in 1924, it was translated into English and published in New York. Zamyatin’s plays were subsequently dropped from Soviet theaters’ repertoires and his new books rejected by state publishers. In 1931, realizing that his life as a writer in the Soviet Russia was over, Zamyatin appealed directly to Iosif Stalin, asking permission to leave the country. Thanks to some influential friends, he secured Stalin’s personal permission and emigrated to France, where he died in March 1937.  
Yevgheniy Zamyatin, We
As far back as 1920, Russian writer Yevgheniy Zamyatin wrote We — the novel Ursula K. Le Guin called “the best single work of science fiction yet written” — the book that inspired 1984, Brave New World, Anthem, and the whole new literary genre of dystopia. Digit D-503 is a proud and happy citizen of the United Nation, where people live in identical glass houses and think identical transparent thoughts, equal among themselves and equally happy to be cogs in the machine of the most perfect society that ever existed on earth. The designer of the Integral, the United Nation’s first spaceship, meant to carry “mathematically error-free” happiness to other forms of intelligent life “possibly still existing in the primitive state of freedom,” D- 503 is a True Believer in the path of the United Nation until he is mugged by reality that comes in the guise of love for a beautiful, cynical woman who rejects state- sponsored happiness and delights in leading a rebellion. We, the mother of all dystopias — more relevant than ever in today’s political climate — is now available in a new, XXI-century literary translation into readable, idiomatic, contemporary American English. Since its publication in 2003, ENC Press’s edition of We has been taught in colleges across the United States. trade paperback | ISBN 9780972832137 5.25" x 8.25" 208 pp.
Yevgheniy Zamyatin, We Covers may  vary slightly from the ones pictured on the website.
© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003                     
RRP $16.75
YEVGHENIY ZAMYATIN was born in a small Russian town, to a poor aristocratic family, in 1884. Trained in St. Petersburg as an engineer and shipbuilder, in 1920, Zamyatin wrote We as a parody of a utopia written by two Communist ideologues whose main conceit was global reorganization of the world based on “eradication of soul and the feeling of love in man.” He sent the manuscript abroad, where, in 1924, it was translated into English and published in New York. Zamyatin’s plays were subsequently dropped from Soviet theaters’ repertoires and his new books rejected by state publishers. In 1931, realizing that his life as a writer in the Soviet Russia was over, Zamyatin appealed directly to Iosif Stalin, asking permission to leave the country. Thanks to some influential friends, he secured Stalin’s personal permission and emigrated to France, where he died in March 1937.  
Yevgheniy Zamyatin, We
As far back as 1920, Russian writer Yevgheniy Zamyatin wrote We — the novel Ursula K. Le Guin called “the best single work of science fiction yet written” — the book that inspired 1984, Brave New World, Anthem, and the whole new literary genre of dystopia. Digit D-503 is a proud and happy citizen of the United Nation, where people live in identical glass houses and think identical transparent thoughts, equal among themselves and equally happy to be cogs in the machine of the most perfect society that ever existed on earth. The designer of the Integral, the United Nation’s first spaceship, meant to carry “mathematically error- free” happiness to other forms of intelligent life “possibly still existing in the primitive state of freedom,” D-503 is a True Believer in the path of the United Nation until he is mugged by reality that comes in the guise of love for a beautiful, cynical woman who rejects state-sponsored happiness and delights in leading a rebellion. We, the mother of all dystopias — more relevant than ever in today’s political climate — is now available in a new, XXI-century literary translation into readable, idiomatic, contemporary American English. Since its publication in 2003, ENC Press’s edition of We has been taught in colleges across the United States. trade paperback | ISBN 9780972832137 5.25" x 8.25" 208 pp.
RRP $16.75
Linda S. Farne’s translation captures the agony of this tension, as well as the confusion rotating around the idea of an infinite truth. Are we meant to exist in a specified manner, or is there some kind of logic hidden in disorder? — Sarah, Goodreads
Yevgheniy Zamyatin, We
© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003. Covers may  vary slightly from the ones pictured here.