© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003                      The covers of the books you receive may differ very slightly from those pictured here.
In the best classical tradition, this epistolary novel strives to make sense of the world in which the letter-writer finds himself, alone and misunderstood by everyone. Whom is a young man to call upon to share his yearning for a simpler, more natural life? The narrator appeals to the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, whose deranged Santa Claus image transfixed him as a boy and whose terminal anti- tech vendetta now captivates him in these ever-more-simulated days. Having procured the Unabomber’s inmate address from the Internet, the narrator uncaps his pen and starts writing letters. Lots of them. Letters about college that feels like glorified obedience training; about the prospect of mediocre careerism sitting on his head like an obese girlfriend; about relationships guided by fashion-magazine tips; about the conservation land where he puffed his first joint being paved over for luxury housing; about his best friend gradually opting for more cyber-chat and less real-life interaction . . . With humor, self-deprecation, and irony that are only intensified by despair, Dear Mr. Unabomber explores the barrenness and slavish conformity running ghostlike in circles of the social media hell. When you have no one else to turn to, Ted Kaczynski must become your BFF. Illustrated by the author
Ray Cavanaugh, Dear Mr. Unabomber
RAY CAVANAUGH is known to take astonishingly long walks. He has a rather distinctive gait, because his legs are quite uncoordinated. His nickname is Noodles, assigned to him because a freakish wingspan and slim physique make for arms that look like noodles. He applies tons of heart, boundless enthusiasm, and all the intangibles to writing “Celtic Scribes,” a column about dead Irish writers, which has appeared in publications from London to Vancouver.
If this guide to skating through college and these bad date post-mortems aren’t 99% autobiographical, then Cavanaugh has an excellent ear for the ways of the world, and if they are true tales then he knows how to put life to paper. Roctober Magazine Reviews
Ray Cavanaugh, Dear Mr. Unabomber
GIFT EDITION trade paperback | ISBN 9780975254080 8.5" x 8.5" 164 pp.
RRP $13.75
Covers may  vary slightly from the ones pictured on the website.
© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003                     
In the best classical tradition, this epistolary novel strives to make sense of the world in which the letter-writer finds himself, alone and misunderstood by everyone. Whom is a young man to call upon to share his yearning for a simpler, more natural life? The narrator appeals to the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, whose deranged Santa Claus image transfixed him as a boy and whose terminal anti-tech vendetta now captivates him in these ever-more-simulated days. Having procured the Unabomber’s inmate address from the Internet, the narrator uncaps his pen and starts writing letters. Lots of them. Letters about college that feels like glorified obedience training; about the prospect of mediocre careerism sitting on his head like an obese girlfriend; about relationships guided by fashion-magazine tips; about the conservation land where he puffed his first joint being paved over for luxury housing; about his best friend gradually opting for more cyber- chat and less real-life interaction . . . With humor, self-deprecation, and irony that are only intensified by despair, Dear Mr. Unabomber explores the barrenness and slavish conformity running ghostlike in circles of the social media hell. When you have no one else to turn to, Ted Kaczynski must become your BFF. Illustrated by the author
Ray Cavanaugh, Dear Mr. Unabomber
RAY CAVANAUGH is known to take astonishingly long walks. He has a rather distinctive gait, because his legs are quite uncoordinated. His nickname is Noodles, assigned to him because a freakish wingspan and slim physique make for arms that look like noodles. He applies tons of heart, boundless enthusiasm, and all the intangibles to writing “Celtic Scribes,” a column about dead Irish writers, which has appeared in publications from London to Vancouver.
RRP $13.75
If this guide to skating through college and these bad date post-mortems aren’t 99% autobiographical, then Cavanaugh has an excellent ear for the ways of the world, and if they are true tales then he knows how to put life to paper. Roctober Magazine Reviews
Ray Cavanaugh, Dear Mr. Unabomber
GIFT EDITION trade paperback | ISBN 9780975254080 8.5" x 8.5" 164 pp.
© ENC Press 2018. Tipping sacred cows since 2003. Covers may  vary slightly from the ones pictured here.