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Readers’ reviews:

Think of this book as the hilarious (and much farther in the future) version of 1984. . . . The witty dialogue and over-the-top situational comedy add strength to this book. . . . Described easily, this book is a passionate expression of what society could become if we decide to stop living for ourselves.” The Book Chubi

The Alphabet Challenge combines humor, potent social satire, and a very creative history of the U.S.A over the next fifty years to create a politically-charged, clever and hard-to-put-down story. The Catalyst

This is real literature, skillfully interwining the classical model of a picaresque novel and the most modern views, topics, and language. . . . I’d [have liked] to see the final scene stronger and more definite. But then I decided that maybe this book is just the beginning of a series devoted to the adventures of Howell Toland and the author did not want to put a full stop. If this is the case, I wish I could subscribe for the next book as well.” Natasha, St. Petersburg, Russia

“Although Ms. Galvins social and political leanings are considerably to the right of mine, it is just so damned refreshing to read a work of such topicality done with so much intelligence, wit and panache. Few writers are willing to take on the New York Zeitgeist as head-on as Ms. Galvin does here, and to such effect. She places the whole city in a fishbowl, and one can spend hour after enjoyable hour watching the fish wiggle by, one by one. . . . The work has inspired me to look more closely at the other titles at ENC Press. If they come close to matching Ms. Galvin’s originality, then I’m sure I’ve found the publishing oasis that so many of us looking for bold, imaginative works of literature, with an eye-popping timeliness, have been searching for.” Richard Margolin

Satirical pleasures abound: moral exhibitionism is everywhere in Gardner Galvin’s energetic narrative, with escalating crusades against incorrect behavior and attitudes. . . . Astutely, Gardner Galvin renders these comic absurdities in a deliberately stripped-down prose style; the deadpan approach renders the narrative’s absurdities all the more hilarious. . . . Perhaps Gardner Galvin’s own background growing up in the final years of the Soviet Union keeps her alert to the dangerous irrationalities of groupthink and the reduction of literature to propaganda. Certainly, her honed intelligence and satiric sensibility are long overdue. One hopes Gardner Galvin and other tough-minded authors are the leaders of a nascent battle against the PC chokehold upon literature.” Prof. Steven D. Vivian, English Dept., South Suburban College, IL